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Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

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Re: Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

Postby Willie Caja on Fri Oct 24, 2014 12:29 pm

If he can enjoy a half-normal life it would be remarkable. Kudos to the doctors treating him. And I hope he can make it and recover as much as possible.
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Re: Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

Postby Lawrence on Wed Nov 19, 2014 7:44 pm

Well, a Russian news site is reporting that he is still paralyzed, unable to talk and there is clearly some brain damage. He is wheelchair bound. I will post the link later.

Sad if it is true.

It may be a repeat of what Philippe Streiff said (see the front page).
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Re: Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

Postby Sakae on Wed Nov 19, 2014 9:23 pm

I think Russians are re-quoting this:

“He has memory problems and speech problems,” added 59 year old Streiff, who visited Schumacher when the German was in intensive care in Grenoble Hospital.” The Telegraph reports that, “Schumacher’s spokeswoman Sabine Kehm said Streiff’s comments were his opinions and she therefore did not want to comment.”She added: “He [Streiff] did not have contact with us.”

Information on Schumacher’s condition and recovery has been scarce since the holiday skiing accident on 29 December 2013 in the French Alps, although his website has been relaunched acommemorating his life and huge achievements in Formula 1.




J. Todt however visited recently Michael in Switzerland, and commented on his situation cautiously, but somewhat more upbeat.
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Re: Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

Postby Sakae on Sun Dec 28, 2014 8:07 pm

December 29, 2013 - it is a year now, and many of us haven't forgotten.
My thoughts are with the family.
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Re: Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

Postby Lyria on Mon Dec 29, 2014 7:48 am

Sakae wrote:December 29, 2013 - it is a year now, and many of us haven't forgotten.
My thoughts are with the family.
S.



I was going to post more or less the exact same thing. Great minds eh?

Keep fighting Michael :sun:
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Re: Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

Postby Sakae on Mon Dec 29, 2014 3:59 pm

:)
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Re: Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

Postby Sakae on Sat Jan 03, 2015 7:54 am

Jan 3 - Michael is 46, and Scuderia did not forget about him. Not bad at all!
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Re: Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

Postby Mach on Sun Feb 08, 2015 1:52 am

Any news?
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Re: Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

Postby Sakae on Mon Feb 09, 2015 5:43 am

GP247
Michael Schumacher’s son Mick is set on his own road to Formula 1, with news that he is signing to compete in Formula 4 this season.
It remains to be seen if this is for real, or just wishful thinking. Michael will be proud if Mick pulls it off. (I think he is about 15).
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Re: Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

Postby Sakae on Thu Apr 09, 2015 7:18 am

I didn't want to open a separate thread for this, but as a note related o Michael's family, his son Mick (16) is following his father's career.

GP247:

A huge media contingent is set to descend on what is normally a low-profile test session of the minor German single-seater category Formula 4. Die Welt reports that some 100 journalists, photographers and camera crews have registered to work this week at the Oschersleben circuit, attracting all the attention is the newly 16-year-old Mick Schumacher. The son of the great F1 legend Michael is making his official pre-season test debut ahead of his move into single-seater racing in 2015.

His teammate at the Van Amersfoort team is Harrison Newey, the son of the Red Bull designer Adrian.

But Welt said all the attention will be on Mick, and not just because of his famous surname but also because of the brain injury suffered by Mick’s father while the pair were skiing in the French alps in late 2013. However, ADAC – the German automobile federation that runs Formula 4 – said Mick Schumacher will not receive any special treatment as he follows his father’s footsteps into car racing. “Mick will be treated like any other driver,” a spokesman is quoted as saying. And Schumacher’s boss Frits van Amersfoort added: “Of course we know that his father is a seven time world champion. But I want to emphasize that Mick will take the time to learn the trade of the racing driver.” The F4 season begins at Oschersleben later this month.


Good luck to him. (He ended up 2nd in German/EU karting championship last year).
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Re: Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

Postby Bourbon on Sat Apr 11, 2015 5:41 am

He's doing great so far. He had a bit of a crash, but was right back out doing well. I think Michael is happy to see everyone carry on with things he encouraged - not just his family, but many around him. I'm still feeling positive that he will eventually be able to express that himself to them all.
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Re: Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

Postby Sakae on Sun May 17, 2015 2:22 pm

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Re: Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

Postby Sakae on Tue Jul 07, 2015 7:04 pm

17-year-old Gina claimed gold at the FEI European Reining Championships in Switzerland, beating 46 riders from nine different countries to claim individual victory in the Juniors and Young Riders category.

Gina also picked up a second gold as a key member of the Germany squad that won the team event.
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Re: Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

Postby Bourbon on Wed Jul 08, 2015 6:07 am

Good for Gina. Looks like talent runs in the family. :)
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Re: Michael Schumacher in coma after Skiing accident.

Postby Sakae on Sat Dec 12, 2015 12:15 pm

Willem Toet, F1's aerodynamics specialist, former member of Benetton, Ferrari, BAR/Honda, BMW Sauber/Sauber, gives his insight on Schumacher and how he became the driver that he was.

"Driving in Formula 1 – Michael Schumacher", some background

Working out how to drive a Formula 1 car.

Michael Schumacher may not be universally loved, but there is no doubt he was one of the strongest of his era. With Senna missing from the ranks after 1994, he had few long-term rivals while he was at his driving peak. My first introduction to Michael was when he came and drove for Benetton. Michael had driven the Jordan, which was a reasonable car but not as quick as the Benetton, and managed to qualify 7th at Spa in 1991 in his first GP. This was generally believed to be a remarkable achievement for a rookie. He then cooked the clutch at the start so did not even complete a lap. Not the most auspicious start to a Fomula 1 career after such a brilliant qualifying. Flavio Briatore (who ran Benetton at the time) immediately signed him and his first GP for “us” was at Monza where he finished 5th. 1991 was definitely a learning year for Michael.

Michael always had a very precise, consistent way of driving; he could adapt his style to suit whatever was necessary. He was also very analytical and extremely serious about his job. Out of the car he was a relatively normal intelligent human being. When he wasn’t at work you were able to crack jokes, talk to him about almost anything.

In the car he seemed to have the ability to drive the car with his driving brain while having plenty of spare mental capacity to record extra information or discuss strategy with his engineers. From feedback I had when I joined the team (when it was called Toleman Group Motorsport) this was something that Ayrton Senna also had. The team engineers were stunned in the early days that Michael could drive the car for 3 laps and tell them what the car did corner entry, mid-corner and corner exit – for each lap. At first we didn’t believe that he could accurately record all this information but, as the data logging improved, we were able to see what he was talking about and understood that, yes, he was able to actually record all this information in his head. You could look at the data but his comments were faster so, once you learned to believe him, you could set the car up more quickly because he would communicate the most important pieces of information immediately.

One of the early surprises was Michael trying to cope with a car that did not have traction control and trying to get the best out of it. One of the ways he described it was: he would push the accelerator to come out of the corner, the car would start to slide so he’d come off the “gas” again but this was happening faster than we could believe and, at the time, I think we were only logging the throttle position at 10 or 20 times per second. When we started logging the throttle position at higher frequencies, we could see what he was doing. We realised that he was pushing the car into a slide, the yaw rate would begin to increase, then he would back off the throttle and the yaw rate would begin to decrease until he would get back on the throttle again. Something we hadn’t seen at that speed before from other drivers.

One of the early things that he asked for was a speedometer. At first we all laughed at this – race drivers use the tacho (rpm meter). So he explained that the tacho was very useful but “If I come out of the corner in 3rd gear or I come out of the same corner in 2nd gear, I want to know whether it actually helps my acceleration. Do I reach a higher top speed or is the extra acceleration in 2nd lost when I change gear? If I change gear earlier in top gear, when the engine feels a bit flat, I want to know whether it helps my top speed. If I change the actual gear ratios, then all my references are gone if I’ve only got rpm.” So, to the rescue came Richard Marshall (Head of Electronics) and we gave Michael a digital speed display. It was added onto the cockpit rim in the driver’s line of sight. Richard was and is a cautious person (I’m a bit the opposite) and didn’t want to throw an extra data logger and displays onto the car without testing them first if it was possible to test somehow. So the hillclimb car we shared grew some extra sensors and displays within days of Michael’s request so that we could test the system at the weekend before it was transferred onto the F1 car for the following event.

1992 - Me (Willem) in the Peugeot 205 hillclimb car that I shared with Richard Marshall. Car was used as a test bed for electronic devices (not just for the speed display). Note pitot–static tube mounted on passenger side of car above the door. The motive for testing things on the Peugeot was to help the team do a better job at races – no to help us. Sometimes we also benefited, but Richard was employed at Benetton partly because he already had a data logger he’d designed himself on the hillclimb car and the F1 team needed to get up to date....


So Michael had his little remote speed display, he used it to help with his driving technique, but then he commented that he felt that it wasn’t quite as easy as he’d thought to read. He said: “In the middle of a corner, when I’m making the apex, it’s a bit hard to focus on the speed. Things are changing so quickly so you can’t really watch the speedo and be sure that you’ve seen the lowest speed. Then, if you want to watch your top speed at the end of the straight, it’s not so easy to watch there either because you’ve really got to be watching for your brake marker.” So what he said he would really like now was 3 speed displays. I suspect at this point we looked a bit puzzled so he explained what he wanted: “I’d like to keep the real-time speedo in the middle, where it is. Then on the left I would like a speed display that shows the minimum speed in a corner. It should hold that speed until I go for the brakes again. Then when I go for the brakes that can be reset to give me the new minimum speed. Then on the right I’d like another speed display to remember the maximum speed I reached until I’ve been flat on the throttle for a second or two so I can read the maximum speed from the previous straight”. Richard went back to work out how that could be done and gave Michael that arrangement. You can imagine that the displays themselves and the way they were configured went though some iterations.

So we gave him those and then he started to play. He would experiment with ratios, driving styles, racing lines and also use it to assess setup changes. After a few years Michael decided he knew how to drive a F1 car now and didn’t need the speedos any more, but that was a learning exercise for him. (My friend Richard comments that actually, the FIA rules on Driver Aids – even back then - meant we couldn’t run them after a while).

A different post from me this time. If you have additional information that can add to this, please DO share it. I have another couple of posts relating to this to follow but this one is already huge so I'll stop here. Please share if you feel it is useful for other people to read."

Source: Willem Toet's LinkedIn account (https://www.linkedin...und-willem-toet)
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